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An exploration of the role of group work in supporting young people affected by parental substance misuse

Hargrave, Cally and Andrews, Danielle, Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC), corp creator. (2010) An exploration of the role of group work in supporting young people affected by parental substance misuse.

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Abstract

The Drugs and Young People Project (DYPP) is a small project working with children and young people affected by the substance misuse of their parents/carers. In 2007 DYPP developed a programme of group work in response to the particular needs of the young people with whom they were working. Individual work with these young people is well established, however group work is relatively rare and there is little research into its impact. Work with children affected by parental substance misuse has historically fallen between young people’s safeguarding services and adult treatment services so is a particularly challenging field for integrated work. This project analysed and evaluated the impact of a group work programme on young people affected by parental substance misuse and the role of integrated working in the delivery and development of this programme. A qualitative interview process, with four young people, their parents/carers and social workers, was employed. The foster carers and the parents of the children living at home were asked to take part, and all agreed. All were female. Parents of children in foster care were approached but none were successfully interviewed. The data which emerged was analysed and particular themes emerged. It was found that group work had specific benefits and that well established integrated working was critical to maximizing these benefits. The theme which emerged most strongly was the value of being a part of a group with young people you know have had some similar experiences. There are three implications of this common experience for young people: it makes it safe to be social; they know you are not the only one; and coping strategies can be shared, thus building on resilience. We hope that our findings will enable us to target and improve provision of group work for young people affected by parental substance misuse both within and beyond the Drugs and Young People Project. To this end the Drugs and Young People Project are putting together a manual or workbook which brings together the learning from this project and from the previous group work cycles and will be used with young people over the coming months.

Item Type: Document from Web
Publisher: Children’s Workforce Development Council
Additional Information: http://shortbreakcarers.cwdcouncil.org.uk/assets/0001/0765/PDF_-_PLR0809035.pdf
Depositing User: Editor (1)
Date Deposited: 27 May 2011 11:17
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2012 18:22
URI: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/2776
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