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‘I’m excluded – who’s gonna care?’ Multi-agency teams supporting the care of excluded children in educational settings – policy into practice, what works and what doesn’t? (Sharing our experience, Practitioner-led research 2008-2009; PLR0809/062)

Connolly, Andrea and Shewring, Michelle, Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC), corp creator. (2009) ‘I’m excluded – who’s gonna care?’ Multi-agency teams supporting the care of excluded children in educational settings – policy into practice, what works and what doesn’t? (Sharing our experience, Practitioner-led research 2008-2009; PLR0809/062).

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Abstract

The aim of the research was to discover who meets the needs of children at risk of exclusion, an interest sparked by meeting vulnerable children and listening to their stories. The research team wanted to discover whether strategies used do meet policy and best practice guidance. Are multi-agency teams successful? How do children feel about those who provide their care? Semi-structured interviews were used, as well as discussion groups, with the following professionals and young people: • one Further Education administrator • two Further Education programme co-ordinators • one primary school Pastoral Support team member • one primary school head teacher • two secondary school Pastoral Support team members • three social workers • one sports coach • one sports coach assistant • three foster carers • seven young people. In addition, we carried out a literature review to discover that when schools work in conjunction with a range of other professionals, in a manner which includes children and parents and makes the process comfortable and child-led, results are good. Children feel supported and are able to achieve. The research also identified that our agencies appear, at times, to misinterpret the guidance, or simply ignore it – allowing egos, personalities and inconsequential agendas to interfere with pastoral care. Examples of good practice to share with others have been identified, as have a few challenges, the avoidance of which might make the difference for some children. The research discovered that behaviour support personnel in schools appear to have a valuable role to play for vulnerable children, as do many others however; also, excitingly there are instances of good practice which may limit incidents of exclusion. This PLR project has provided opportunity to discover how outcomes for children can be improved by working together, also that one person alone can make all the difference.

Item Type: Document from Web
Publisher: Children’s Workforce Development Council
Additional Information: http://www.cwdcouncil.org.uk/assets/0000/7269/PLR0809062.pdf
Depositing User: Editor (1)
Date Deposited: 27 May 2011 13:34
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2012 18:22
URI: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/2782
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