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Children as partners: Children’s perspectives on parental involvement

Chapman, Lynnette and Wood, Jim, Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC), corp creator. (2009) Children as partners: Children’s perspectives on parental involvement.

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Abstract

This research explores the extent to which the child’s voice (aged seven to 11 years) can be included as part of the integrated working agenda. In particular, it considers whether children’s views can be collected around the area of parental involvement in their children’s education in order to inform policy and practice. The study aimed to consider the following research questions: 1. How can we best capture the child’s voice as part of the integrated working agenda? 2. How can we best measure parents’ involvement in their children’s education from the child’s perspective? A self-completion questionnaire was completed by 113 children from a school in an area facing deprivation and poverty. The questionnaire was developed to explore the extent to which children were able to reflect on and answer questions about parental involvement. The focus of the questionnaire was to measure involvement and joint activity between the child and an adult in the household. Data collection for the study was carried out in a school setting. The study demonstrates that children are able to give their views on parental involvement and that a questionnaire is an effective and efficient means of collecting their views. However, future research might consider the role of qualitative methods and how they might complement and add to quantitative information about parental involvement from the child’s perspective. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that there is great scope to include the child’s voice as part of integrated working and to a greater extent than currently takes place. Children are well placed to provide an insight into parental involvement and questionnaires can be a fun and effective way for them to share their perceptions and experiences.

Item Type: Document from Web
Variant Title: Children as partners: Children’s perspectives on parental involvement: Sharing our experience Practitioner-led research 2008-2009, PLR0809/015
Publisher: Children’s Workforce Development Council
Additional Information: Some content has been redacted due to third party rights or other legal issues and is labelled as such in the document.
Depositing User: Editor (1)
Date Deposited: 11 May 2011 09:59
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2015 16:44
URI: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/2801
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