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What should excellent integrated service delivery feel like and look like from a young person’s point of view? – ‘Don’t treat me like I’m a bother’ (Sharing our experience, Practitioner-led research 2008-2009; PLR0809/096)

Stott, Julie (2009) What should excellent integrated service delivery feel like and look like from a young person’s point of view? – ‘Don’t treat me like I’m a bother’ (Sharing our experience, Practitioner-led research 2008-2009; PLR0809/096).

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Abstract

Gateshead Young Women’s Outreach Project (GYWOP) offers support, information and empowering learning opportunities for young women, including young mothers, aged 13 to 19. The research team, including peer researchers, worked with young women accessing GYWOP, as well as 58 other services, to ascertain what excellent integrated working practice looks like and feels like for young women. Six focus groups, comprising approximately 30 young women, were involved in the research. The first was peer researchers. Two of the groups consisted of young women who were pregnant, or mothers who were involved in the project as they were not yet ready to move on to other more formal education, employment or training. Another consisted of mothers or expectant mothers who were of statutory school age. Another was made up of young women of statutory school age but not mothers, who either did not attend school or attended very little due to circumstances often related to bullying. The last group consisted of young women, some of whom were mothers, who had issues in their lives, resulting in isolation and low selfesteem. The main findings were as follows. • The importance of the ethos and general environment of the service. This impacts on the engagement of young women and adds to their confidence and general wellbeing, contributing to positive outcomes and progression. • The value of the service and a holistic approach are important, as is ease of access, varied communication methods, a range of social interaction and learning opportunities. • Being treated with respect is paramount. • Perceptions - young women can ‘pick up’ on things that are not necessarily intended - workers need to be extra sensitive and aware of the impact on young women. • It is vital that young women feel that they can trust workers. For young women in care, confidentiality is a serious concern, leading to the feeling that ‘everyone knows their business’. • Young women need to feel in control of what is happening to them and value voluntary engagement with services. • Affirmation by workers has an extremely positive impact, giving feelings of pride and self-worth. The findings will be used to produce awareness-raising interactive training sessions and materials, to be delivered

Item Type: Document from Web
Publisher: Children’s Workforce Development Council
Additional Information: http://www.cwdcouncil.org.uk/assets/0000/7272/PLR0809096.pdf
Depositing User: Editor (1)
Date Deposited: 27 May 2011 15:34
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2012 18:22
URI: http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/id/eprint/2790
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